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FILM REVIEW BY BETSY SHARKEY

"The Lesser Blessed" is a little indie gem [that] captures harsh realities with tender grace."

"THE LESSER BLESSED" FILM REVIEW BY GREG KLYMKIW (JUL 1 2013)

"There is one role in the film that could have been delivered with by-the-numbers histrionics, but Tamara Podemski as our hero's Mom is brilliantly understated to the point of heartbreak - this wonderful actress's smallest gestures or in many cases, "non"-gestures, are as riveting as they are deeply and profoundly moving. This is the kind of finely wrought performance that some might overlook because it is so great."

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"SUNDANCE SHOCKERS" - PETER TRAVERS (FEB 28 2007)

"Oscar Maybes...And don't worry if you've never heard of Tamara Podemski - see her in FOUR SHEETS TO THE WIND as a Native American who has moved way off the reservation, and you'll remember her name and how to spell it. She's the knockout discovery of Sundance '07."

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"HOLLYWOOD'S A BAD, BAD BOYFRIEND" - KIM VOYNAR (FEB 15 2007)

"If we want to support more women filmmakers making good narrative films…more actresses taking on challenging, non-traditional roles (see: Kate Winslet in Little Children, Ellen Page in Hard Candy, Jess Weixler in Teeth, Nicole Kidman in Fur, Tamara Podemski in Four Sheets to the Wind -- I want to see a LOT more of her -- or Toni Collette in pretty much anything), then we need to get off our collective duffs and stop accepting less."

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"REVIEWS" - ZACK HADDAD (JAN 24 2007)

"Podemski's Miri is especially fun to watch, mostly due to all her foolish choices, providing classic comic relief."

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"FOUR SHEETS TO THE WIND" REVIEW BY PATRICK Z. MCGAVIN (JAN 28 2007)

"Well played by Podemski, the part of Miri takes on a darker filigree, and she adopts quickly and decisively the character's abrupt, constantly shifting emotional movements."

"FOUR SHEETS TO THE WIND" REVIEW BY DUANE BYRGE (JAN 25 2007)

"The performances are richly subdued. Podemski's performance as [Cufe's] hard-drinking sister shows the young woman's fears and loneliness."

"SARAH KUHN AND GREGG GOLDSTEIN'S SUNDANCE REVIEW" (FEB 14 2007)

"Special recognition for Tamara Podemski as "talent that broke through this year" for her role in "Four Sheets to the Wind."

TORONTO SAGE MAGAZINE

"SPIRIT VOICES" ALBUM REVIEW BY JASON RYLE (NOV 15 2002)

"Local musician and Broadway star Tamara Podemski should prepare an acceptance speech for next year's Canadian Aboriginal Music Awards. Her new album, a collection of 12 original songs tentatively called "From the Drum," takes music to another level with a successful blend of hand drums, guitars, piano, and other instruments. As food as the music, however, it is Podemski's deep and soothing voice - singing primarily in Ojibway - that draws the listener into a place of beauty. "All of the tracks began as hand drum songs that I wrote," Podemski says. "We then built on top of that with other instruments. This is why I want to call it "From the Drum" as all the songs were born from the hand drum." The talented Podemski wrote all lyrics, and melodies for the album; her collaborator, Ron Allen, a local musician, co-wrote, co-arranged and co-produced with Podemski who recorded the album in four days. The album begins with one of the many standout tracks, Meegwetch, an upbeat song of thanks where Podemski's voice flows like a gentle river. Each song follows the other like the seasons: the album's calibre is so strong that every song fits into the other seamlessly. Roundlake 49er a bittersweet song that best demonstrates how Podemski blends Ojibway with English, and the drum with the guitar. On Wasaya, Podemski's voice is mixed on top of itself creating a layer of depth that shows the beauty of the Ojibway language. In a field that is so diverse and talented, "From the Drum" [Spirit Voices] is one of the strongest new albums by a Native artist."

THE DAILY VAULT

"SPIRIT NATION" ALBUM REVIEW BY DUKE EGBERT (JAN 11 2002)

"Spirit Nation sounds complicated. After all, the lead singer is half Native American and half Israeli, and sings in Ojibway, English, and Hebrew; that in and of itself makes this a rather ambitious project with definite UN-peacekeeping-force overtones. With something this eclectic, one is always apprehensive as to whether the goulash of cultural references will work. On Winter Moons, it does work, and works astonishingly well. Make no mistake; Spirit Nation is very much lead singer Tamara Podemski's project. While the backing musicianship is competent to talented, providing an interesting synthesis of traditional, trance, pop, and dance as background, the feature is Podemski's arching, intricate, razor-precise vocals. While superficially similar to New Age etheric warblers like Enya, Podemski has more grit and fire to her voice. The liner notes indicate that this was envisioned as a tribute to her twin heritages, and the passion and fire in her singing shows that she truly did mean to honor all those who have gone before her, and better than that, succeeded in that honoring. Production wise, Winter Moons is flawless. (Ah, why I like the 21st century -- the fact that there are fewer CDs that sound bad on the recording end). For lovers of world music, this is one of the best things I've heard in a long time, and worth the effort to search it out. Grab Winter Moons today. RATING: A"

"HEART-STOPPING MOMENTS ON THEATRE'S THRILL RIDES" - PETER MARKS (AUG 27 1999)

"Performed by the musical's lesbian couple, Joanne and Maureen [Tamara Podemski], "Take Me or Leave Me" is a song in which lovers prove nothing except that they get a sexual charge out of fighting. It is a number about rivalry...the only convention not observed, yet totally earned, is an encore!!!"

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